Your questions about the Covid-19 vaccine - Updated

Take a look at what you need to know about the COVID-19 vaccination programme, including how you will know when it's your turn, where to go, and why it's important.
The jab protects your teen and your family NHS poster
Updated 22nd November 2021

For the latest information on the Covid-19 vaccine - click here to visit the NHS website.

For the latest COVID-19 information from the NHS South East London Clinical Commissioning Group click here.

Vaccinations for adults

Everyone aged over 18 years or within three months of their eighteenth birthday is now encouraged to get their Covid-19 vaccination

There are a number of different places you can get your vaccination - from walk-in clinics to pre-booked appointments at some GP practices, pharmacies and other centres. 

You are eligible for two jabs and can get your second dose after at least 8 weeks have passed since your first dose. 

Vaccinations for 16 and 17 year olds

All 16 and 17 year olds in our area are now being offered two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

You can book your second dose from 12 weeks after getting your 1st dose.

You can get your jab at any of the daily vaccination walk-in venues across our area.

You can also book your jab via the national booking service.

All those aged 16 or over can book their vaccination through the NHS booking service. You can also call 119 free of charge, anytime between 7am and 11pm seven days a week.

You can also visit a walk-in Covid-19 vaccination site to get vaccinated without needing an appointment. Or you can wait to be contacted by your GP and book your appointment with them.

A list of walk-in vaccine centres can be found using the following links:

 

If you are aged 12 to 15

All children aged 12 to 15 will be offered a 1st dose of COVID-19 vaccine. You can get your vaccine at school or you can book a vaccination appointment online

If you live with someone who is more likely to get infections, or you have a condition that means you are at high-risk from COVID-19, you will be offered two doses of the vaccine. 

Children will be offered one dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. Most vaccinations will be delivered through a school-based vaccination programme, the same as for HPV and Diphtheria, Tetanus and Polio.

If you receive home schooling, are in secure services, or specialist mental health settings, then provision will be put in place to ensure you are still offered one dose of the vaccine.

Parental, guardian or carer consent will be sought before vaccinations are given in line with existing school vaccination programme policies.

How long between my first and second dose of the vaccine?

You will usually receive your second dose up to 8-12 weeks after the first, regardless of the vaccine type. The second dose completes the course and is important for longer term protection.

How do I book my second dose of the vaccine?

You'll need to book a 2nd dose for 8 to 12 weeks after your 1st dose.

Will I be offered a booster shot?

To maintain high levels of protection throughout the winter months, the Government is offering a booster vaccine to those at more risk from COVID-19. 

You'll be offered a booster dose if it has been 152 days (five months) since your 2nd vaccine and you:

  • Live in a residential care home
  • Are aged 40 years and over
  • Are a frontline health or social care worker
  • Are aged 16 to 49 years with an underlying health condition that puts you at higher risk of COVID-19
  • Are aged 16 and over and either live with someone, or are the main carer for someone, at high risk from COVID-19

How and when to get your COVID-19 booster vaccine?

You will be offered the booster at least six months after your second dose.

Most people will be invited to book an appointment at a larger vaccination centre, pharmacy, or local NHS service such as a GP surgery. You can book your COVID-19 vaccine booster appointment on-line. 

If you have not received an invite but it has been more than six months and 1 week (190 days) since your second dose, you can try to book your appointment online without an invite.

Book your appointment

Will I be offered a third dose?

People aged 12 years or older who had a severely weakened immune system at the time they had their second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine may be offered a third vaccine dose. This is different to the booster shots being offered.

This is because you may not have responded as well as other people and a third dose may help to improve your immune response and give you better protection.

People who may be offered a third dose include those who had or have:

  • blood cancers (such as leukaemia or lymphoma)
  • lowered immunity due to treatment (such as steroid medication, biological therapy, chemotherapy or radiotherapy)
  • lowered immunity due to inherited disorders of the immune system
  • an organ or bone marrow transplant
  • diseases that affect the immune system such as poorly controlled HIV
  • other diseases or treatments as advised by your specialist

Your GP will be in contact with your specialist and the NHS will let you know if you need a third dose and when and where to have the vaccine. Government guidance is available if you have further questions.

Which COVID-19 vaccine will I get?

Most people will be offered a booster dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine or Moderna vaccine.

This means your booster dose may be different from the vaccines you had for your 1st and 2nd doses.

Some people may be offered a booster dose of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine if they cannot have the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccine.

Are there any side effects?

Like all medicines, vaccines can cause side effects. Most of these are mild and short-term, and not everyone gets them.

You should not have the vaccine if you've ever had a serious allergic reaction to:

  • any of the ingredients in the vaccine
  • a previous dose of the same COVID-19 vaccine

Serious allergic reactions are rare. If you do have a reaction to the vaccine, it usually happens in minutes. Staff giving the vaccine are trained to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

I'm pregnant, can I still get the vaccine?

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has advised that pregnant women should be offered the COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as the rest of the population, based on their age and clinical risk group.

There have been no specific safety concerns identified with any brand of COVID-19 vaccines in relation to pregnancy. 

It is preferable for pregnant women in the UK to be offered the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines where available. There is no evidence to suggest that other vaccines are unsafe for pregnant women, but more research is needed.

Women who are planning pregnancy, are in the immediate postpartum or are breastfeeding can be vaccinated with any vaccine, depending on their age and clinical risk group

Protect yourself from fraud

In England, the COVID-19 vaccines will only be available via the NHS. You can be contacted by the NHS, your employer, a GP surgery or pharmacy local to you, to receive your vaccine.

Remember, the vaccine is free of charge. At no point will you be asked to pay.

  • The NHS will never ask you for your bank account or card details.
  • The NHS will never ask you for your PIN or banking password.
  • The NHS will never arrive unannounced at your home to administer the vaccine.
  • The NHS will never ask you to prove your identity by sending copies of personal documents such as your passport, driving licence, bills or pay slips.  

Find out more and report fraud

Do I have to have the COVID-19 vaccine even though I've already had COVID-19?

An effective vaccine is the best way to protect people from COVID-19, reduce hospitalisations and save lives. Vaccines are the only way to eradicate disease. 

People that have already had COVID-19 should still get vaccinated. It is still just as important for those who have already had COVID-19 as it is for those who haven’t.  

Is the COVID-19 vaccine compulsory?

There are no plans to make the COVID-19 vaccine compulsory for the general population. Following consultation earlier this year, from 11 November 2021 people who work in care homes – both staff and volunteers – will need to be fully vaccinated. There are some exemptions and the requirement to be fully vaccinated will not extend to people who are visiting friends and families.

Do I need to self-isolate if I'm fully vaccinated?

If you’re fully vaccinated or under 18, you will not need to self-isolate following close contact with someone who has COVID-19. You’ll still need to take a PCR test and self-isolate if it’s positive. Read the latest guidance to find out when you should self-isolate.

How do I prove my vaccine status?

An NHS COVID Pass shows your coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination details or test results. This is your COVID-19 status. You may be asked to show your pass to get into some events, where the COVID Pass is being trialed, or to travel abroad.

A digital COVID pass is available through the NHS App or the NHS website. A paper version is also available online.

The NHS App and/or the NHS COVID pass doesn't accurately reflect my vaccination record, what do I do? 

The Vaccination Data Resolution Service aims to resolve missing or incorrect vaccination records for people vaccinated in England, Scotland or Wales who have a current NHS number and are registered with a GP practice in England. If you believe you have missing or incorrect COVID-19 vaccination data, please call 119 and ask the call agent to make a referral to the VDRS team on your behalf. The VDRS team will then aim to call you back within 21 days. 

If you aren't registered with a GP, you will need to contact your local Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) for assistance. You can find the CCG that covers the area where you live through this CCG list.

What does a vaccine do?

Vaccines teach your immune system how to create antibodies that protect you from diseases. It's much safer for your immune system to learn this through vaccination than by catching the diseases and treating them. Once a vaccine has trained your immune system to know how to fight a disease, it can often protect you for many years. 

Are vaccines safe?

Vaccines are now safer than ever before. Any vaccine must first go through the usual rigorous testing and development process and be shown to strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness before it can be deployed.

How do I feedback or complain about the NHS COVID-19 vaccine service?

If you are unhappy with the service you have received, it is important to let the NHS know. To provide feedback, raise a concern or make a complaint, please email  england.contactus@nhs.net

Is the Covid vaccine safe?

Any coronavirus vaccine that is approved must go through all the clinical trials and safety checks all other licensed medicines go through. Vaccines will only be used if they are approved by the MHRA. 

So far, thousands of people have been given a Covid-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects, such as allergic reactions and blood clots, have been very rare..

Recently there have been reports of a very rare condition involving blood clots and unusual bleeding after the Oxford/AstraZenica vaccination. This is being looked at carefully by the MHRA but the risk factors for this condition are not yet clear.

The JCVI have looked at the balance of benefits and risks. They advise the benefits of vaccination far outweigh the risks for people aged 40+ and those who have underlying health conditions.

And that adults under 40 years without underlying health conditions should be offered an alternative Covid-19 vaccine - where available and only if this does not cause substantial delays in being vaccinated.

Prof Anthony Harnden, GP & Deputy Chair of the JCVI, explains the new advice.

"The risk of blood clots with low platelets from the AstraZeneca vaccine is extremely low. If you've already received one dose of the AZ vaccine and are offered your second dose, you should accept it.”

Read more here

Got a question?

If you have more questions about the COVID-19 vaccination programme you can find more information on the NHS website.

NHS website

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